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Jack Martin remembered as highly regarded social science researcher

Apr. 2, 2015

The late Jack Martin, an esteemed member of the IU Bloomington social-science research community, is being remembered by colleagues as an "invaluable presence" in the Department of Sociology, the College of Arts and Sciences and the university. He died March 22.

Jack Martin

Jack Martin | PHOTO COURTESY OF MARTIN'S FAMILY

“Jack was an invaluable presence in the Department of Sociology, the College and the university,” said Brian Powell, chairman of the Department of Sociology. “He was as up-front and honest as anyone could be. He provided incisive advice to faculty members and graduate students working on their research, and many of us can attribute our research and grant success to Jack’s guidance.”

An avid golfer, a dog lover and a fly fisherman, Martin had a keen interest in history, particularly surrounding World War ll. Born July 9, 1949, in East Chicago, Ind., he earned a B.S. in education from Ball State University in 1972 and his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Utah in 1980.

Before coming to IU, he held a number of university and research positions, including director of the Survey Research Center at the University of Georgia, research professor at Kent State University, faculty member at Penn State University and researcher at the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.

After retiring last year as director of IU’s Schuessler Institute, he served as senior research scientist with the IU School of Public Health-Bloomington, director of research for the school’s Institute for Research on Addictive Behavior and an adjunct professor in the Department of Sociology.

With his wife, IU faculty member Bernice Pescosolido, and other colleagues, he was co-editor of “Handbook of the Sociology of Health, Illness, and Healing” and co-author in recent years of a number of journal articles dealing with mental health and with stigma and prejudice associated with mental illness.

Additional details can be found in Martin's online obituary.

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